Top ten techniques to remediate questions for students with hearing loss

by Jennifer Manley, MS, CED

Teachers ask students wh-questions for a variety of reasons: to engage the class in discussion, to have students demonstrate their knowledge, to gather information, and to assess understanding. Students with hearing loss often find answering questions difficult.  As professionals working with these students, it’s important to have techniques for remediating questions when students have difficulty answering. The goal is to transfer responsibility from the teacher to the students.

Here are ten techniques you can use:

  1. Simply repeat the question:
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
  2. Repeat the question using acoustic highlighting.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
  3. Make a statement to clarify or set up the setting and then ask the question.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Remember we talked about Washington, D.C. and the government.  Who is the President of the United States?
  4. Call the student’s attention to the error he made and redirect to the original question.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: He is the boss of the United States?
    T: You told me his job.  I asked, “Who is the President of the United States?”
  5. Use different vocabulary to reword the question.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Who is the boss of the United States?
    St: Responds correctly.
    T: _____ is the boss, or the President, of the United States.
  6. Give clues to help the student know what his error is. Then reword the question.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: He lives in the White House and has brown hair.
    T: You’re right, you told me about him.  Now what is his name?
  7. Give examples of wrong answers to help guide them to the correct answer.
    T: Who is the President of the United States?
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Is the President George Washington?  Abraham Lincoln?
  8. Have the student reread the text to find the answer. Teachers may accept the student reading the answer from the text but then have the child close or cover the text and tell the answer again or have the student say it using his own language.
  9. Have one child help another child.
    T: Joe, who is the President of the United States?
    St 1: Incorrect or no response.
    T: Sally, can you help Joe by telling him who is the President of the United States?
    St 2: ________ is the President of the United States.
    T: Joe, who is the President of the United States?
    St 1: ________ is the President of the United States.
  10. Teacher asks higher-level comprehension question and then uses breakdown detail questions to help the student formulate his answer. The teacher then asks the original question again.
    Example 1:
    T: Explain the job of the President of the United States.
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: What is one thing the President has to do?
    St: The President helps people.
    T: You are right.  What does the President do to help people?
    St: The President helps make laws.
    T: Yes. Why do we need laws?
    St: The laws help protect the people in the United States.
    T: Explain the job of the President of the United States.
    St: The President helps the people and makes laws to protect the people.Example 2:T: Describe a post office.
    St: Incorrect or no response.
    T: What will you see at a post office?
    St: I will see lots of letters and stamps.
    T: Who works at the post office?
    St: A mail carrier works at the post office.
    T: Describe a post office.

Use a variety of these techniques to help remediate questions with your students. Print the list above to use as a reminder while teaching. Which ones do you find most helpful?

Jennifer Manley served as a classroom teacher for students ages 3 to 12 at CID – Central Institute for the Deaf. She currently works in professional development giving presentations on auditory development and is co-author of CID SPICE for Life, an auditory learning curriculum and author of the 2nd edition of CID SPICE.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This